Rogue Community College
Rogue Community College
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Faculty and Staff

Full-Time Faculty
CULHANE, KEVIN KCulhane@roguecc.edu  541-245-7621  Bio

Faculty

Instructor Culhane, Kevin

Biography

I grew up in New York City, attended the Bronx High School of Science, and went west to do my undergraduate work, first at UC Santa Barbara, and then I transferred to UC Santa Cruz to complete my bachelor’s. I returned to NYC where I studied animation with my father with the hope of creating educational films. Seeking a new direction, I spent several years as a New York City Urban Park ranger, before deciding to travel. I lived in San Francisco, Bristol, England, and finally ended up in the Rogue Valley. I got my master’s and teaching certification at SOU (Southern Oregon State College, at the time), and quickly landed a job teaching various sciences at Crater High school. I taught there for twelve years, and then came to RCC about a decade ago. I am presently teaching the major’s biology, major’s chemistry, and environmental science classes. Drop by if you have any questions!

Degrees Earned

  • University of California at Santa Cruz, B.A.
  • Southern Oregon State College, M.S.

GARDNER, DOUG DGardner@roguecc.edu  541-245-7505  Bio

Faculty & Department Chair

Instructor Gardner, Doug

Biography

Mathematics gives us a beautiful way to describe and understand the world. It is play for the mind and power in the workplace. It is our goal to help you master this most productive and universal language.

Work Experience: 18 years high school math teacher, 12 years general contractor, 10 years architectural designer.

Hobbies: kayaking, mountain biking, skiing and snowboarding.

Degrees Earned

  • University of Oregon, B.S.
  • University of Oregon, M.S.

KEZER, CORRIE CKezer@roguecc.edu  541-245-7680  Bio

Faculty

Instructor Kezer, Corrie

Biography

I teach Anatomy & Physiology, Microbiology, General Biology, and Oceanography here at RCC. I love all sciences, and I will do whatever I can to help others enjoy, learn, and understand the living world around them and within them.



Degrees Earned

  • Oregon State University, B.S.
  • Oregon State University, M.S.
  • University of Nebraska at Kearney, M.S.

RITTENBACH, JAMES (DUSTY) JRittenbach@roguecc.edu  541-245-7513  Bio

Faculty

Instructor Rittenbach, James (Dusty)

Biography

I was born in Medford and lived here until the age of seven at which point my family moved to Pendleton (OR) where I lived until graduate school. My mother taught at the local community college, Blue Mountain Community College, which I also attended. I gained a lot of respect for the community college environment from her work and the excellent teaching I received in mathematics and computer science.

My undergraduate work lead to a double major in physics and applied mathematics at Walla Walla College while also taking more chemistry and biology than most physics majors. At Oregon State University, I completed a MS degree in physics with a minor in biophysics (one of two of the first students to add biophysics to their physics degree). I have been teaching at the community college level since 1994.

I currently live in Medford with my spouse (Lisa) and rescue cats (currently George, Fenris and Rufus). For recreation I enjoy reading, hiking and traveling to other places with good hiking.

Degrees Earned

  • Walla Walla College, B.S.
  • Oregon State University, M.S.

SCHULTZ, DONALD DSchultz@roguecc.edu  541-956-7080  Bio

Faculty

Instructor Schultz, Donald

Biography

I have taught science at the community-college level for nearly two decades, and without a doubt, it is the greatest job I have ever had. When you get paid to spend your day talking to cool people about amazing things, you know that you are truly blessed. I love being in the classroom, interacting with my students and teaching about the incredible world of science that lives in us and around us each moment of our lives. Teaching is my passion, and it is a privilege to serve the students of southern Oregon and RCC.

When I'm not teaching or researching new ideas and topics in the sciences to use in my classroom, I enjoy spending time with my wife and children. I also love hiking, gardening, photography, reading and most of all, riding motorcycles through the beautiful scenery of Oregon and beyond.


Degrees Earned

  • University of Utah, B.S.
  • Southern Oregon University, M.S.

SWAIN, DOROTHY DSwain@roguecc.edu  541-245-7657
541-956-7069 
Bio

Faculty & Department Chair

Instructor Swain, Dorothy

Biography

I was born and raised in Chicago, attended college in downstate Illinois and then proceeded to live, work and study in New York City, Oxford, GA, Milwaukee, WI, Chicago again, Pella, IA, Portland, OR, Ashland, OR, Santa Fe, NM, Coos Bay, OR, Ashland again and now Grants Pass. I feel delighted to have lived in every quadrant of the United States (midwest, NE, SE, NW and SW), and Oregon is definitely my favorite! I also feel delighted to have worked with students at every level from elementary school to graduate school, and community college is definitely my favorite! Wherever I live, I study, teach, read lots of books, converse openly and take in cats. I continue to live a studious life with my husband Gary (a poet) and our cat Roxie (a chaser of bugs). To me the good life is a life rich in ideas.


Degrees Earned

  • University of Illinois, BS
  • Columbia University, MA
  • University of Illinois, PhD
  • Southern Oregon University, MAT

Certificates

  • .Oregon Teaching License/1999.
TURNER, KATIE KTurner@roguecc.edu  541-956-7082  Bio

Faculty

Biography

I was born and mostly raised in Eastern Oregon. I attended Western Oregon University, Rogue Community College and finally graduated from Southern Oregon University. Before starting my full time teaching career I went into aerosol science research. It was fascinating to be involved with the development of new technology to detect biological pathogens! However, after two years of talking to bacteria and viruses (working in the lab for hours), I realized that I missed people. I went back to school to get my M.A.T. with an 8 month old son at home. After a short time of teaching k-12 I moved to the community college where I enjoy teaching biology and anatomy & physiology courses.

Degrees Earned

  • Southern Oregon University, BS
  • Southern Oregon University, MAT

Certificates

  • .Oregon Teaching License/2011.
VAN BRUNT, JAMES (JIM) JVanBrunt@roguecc.edu  541-956-7081  Bio

Faculty

Degrees Earned

  • Barstow Community College, A.A.
  • Cal State Polytechnic University, B.S.
  • Cal State University San Bernardino, M.A.
  • Cal State University San Bernardino, M.S.

Certificates

  • .California Teaching Certificate - Life Science California Teaching Certificate - Physical Science California Administrative Certificate Michigan Teaching Certificate - Life Sciences California Community College Teaching Certificate - Professional Education California School Leadership Academy .
Adjunct Faculty
APPLEBY, DAVID DAppleby@roguecc.edu     
BURSICK, SHELLY SBursick@roguecc.edu    Bio

Biography





Degrees Earned

  • The University of Arkansas, Doctorate
  • The University of Arkansas, Doctorate
  • The University of Arkansas, Masters
  • Southern Oregon University, Bachelors

DESIMONE, GARY GDeSimone@roguecc.edu  541-608-5202  Bio

Adjunct Faculty

Instructor DeSimone, Gary

Biography


Degrees Earned

  • Nassau Community College, AS - Applied Science and Math
  • University of California - Berkeley, BA - Integrative Biological Sciences
  • University of Connecticut, MA - Secondary Education Biology

DHAKAL, BINOD BDhakal@roguecc.edu     
JARVIE, NOAH NJarvie@roguecc.edu    Bio

Adjunct Faculty

Instructor Jarvie, Noah

Biography

I am a chiropractor and an adjunct professor of anatomy and physiology at Rogue Community College. I have been teaching here since 2001. I like the balance of sharing my clinical insight with students and reinforcing my academic knowledge by teaching. I have three children at home and one in college. I attended Brigham Young University for undergraduate work and graduated in 1998 with a BS in Human Anatomy and my Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Parker University in Dallas Texas.




Degrees Earned

  • Parker University, BS
  • Parker University, DC

KERR, ERIN EKerr@roguecc.edu    Bio

Adjunct Faculty

Biography



Degrees Earned

  • Stanford University, BS
  • UC San Diego, MD

LOOZEN, PAUL PLoozen@roguecc.edu  541-245-7527  Bio

Part time Faculty

Instructor Loozen, Paul

Biography

I was born in the Netherlands and immigrated to the U.S. with my family when I was 5 years old. I attended school in San Diego, graduating from San Diego State University in 1976. I taught high school in San Diego County (6 different high schools) for 28 years, teaching subjects such as Biology, AP Biology, Chemistry, Honors Chemistry, AP Chemistry and Veterinary Science. I moved to the Rogue Valley (Rogue River) in 2006 and have been delighted to teach Chemistry at RCC since that time.

Degrees Earned

  • San Diego State University, B.S.
  • Grand Canyon University, M.S.

MADDOCKS, ERIK EMaddocks@roguecc.edu     
MITCHELL, RUSSELL (RUSS) RMitchell@roguecc.edu  541-956-7287  Bio

Part-time Faculty

Biography



Degrees Earned

  • Southern Oregon College, Bachelor of Science
  • Southern Oregon State College, Masters of Science

MOULTON, GLEN GMoulton@roguecc.edu    Bio

Part-time Faculty

Instructor Moulton, Glen

Biography

My professional career began as a first year chemistry teacher in an inner-city Chicago high school. My students taught me more about how to teach than I taught them chemistry. I found that it was easy to teach as I had been taught and not to worry whether the students actually learned anything. However, I always thought that is was the responsibility of the teacher to make it easy for the students to learn. The prevailing thought at the time was that teachers presented the material in lecture fashion and the “good” students got it and the rest were too dumb to learn. After trying the prevailing method, I opted for an approach where the interests and academic willingness of my students became a feature in all lesson planning. I experimented and sought to discover what works to change students into learners. Many different ideas led to many different techniques for teaching students to learn. Most were marginally successful, but highly insightful.

Next I learned that students learn in different ways and different approaches are needed to reach all students. This concept was further cemented when I volunteered to teach general science during summer school to students who had no hope of success. One of the many lessons that the students taught me was to provide something instructional that yields some immediate student success, keeps things simple, straightforward, and forget the nonessential fluff and trivia.

While teaching in Chicago, I seized the opportunity to use an experimental individualized approach to teaching biology developed through Purdue University. The individualized approach resonated with my emerging teaching style. I taught he experimental program for two years before jumping at the chance to attend Purdue University to complete my Master of Science degree as a graduate instructor. I used the knowledge gained from three years of inner city teaching to help pre-service teachers through their Methods course and Student Teaching. I always reminded the aspiring teachers to remain sensitive to the varying needs, backgrounds, and achievement levels of the students, often citing that it is usually the teacher that has failed the student and not the student who has failed the subject. I further challenged newbie teachers to seek out promising students and encourage them to pursue their dreams and interests. Pre-service teachers taught me that the traditional teacher preparation was often inadequate for the realities of surviving in a classroom. While at Purdue, I wrote my first professional article, “A Pre-Service Teacher’s Checklist” which was accepted and published in the Journal of College Science Teaching.

Looking for new experiences and a chance to actually make some money, I moved to Maryland to teach middle school science and math. Understanding middle school students created a new and continual learning experience for me. I found that middle school students are not just smaller versions of their future self, but they actually have different learning styles which appear to mature and evolve over time and experiences. For middle school students, creating the proper experience for learning seem to precede most learning. While in the middle school setting, I wrote an individualized science program based on my experience with individualized instruction for the special needs students in that school. Its success was measured by student achievement, teacher-friendliness, and overall satisfaction by the students. The program changed the learning mode from a passive to an active student stance while allowing the teacher time to arrange meaningful experiences that enhanced student learning. The program was successful in every way. After 1 year, I was offered the chemistry and physics teaching position at the local high school. Over the next 3 years, the enrollment doubled in both subjects as students sought a more engaging way to learn and succeed in difficult science subjects. I provided challenges that were intriguing and somewhat outrageous, so naturally the students loved them. For instance, rather than the worn out egg drop activity, my students stretched surgical tubing between the football goal posts and launched their raw eggs in student-made protective containers. Students also constructed bridges from carefully selected non-traditional raw materials and then measured how much weight they were able to support. My top students after a year of instruction were awarded a “Chemmie” or Physsie” (as opposed to an Emmy) in recognition of their outstanding efforts.

And then began a new chapter in the progression of events.
I was appointed to the position of countywide Supervisor of Instruction for Science which required an understanding of curriculum, instruction, assessment, supervision, staff development, and mostly how to get entrenched, marginal teachers to rethink their position regarding teaching styles, student learning, and ways to improve both. Over the next 24 years, I worked with teachers to improve the achievement of all students.

As the district-wide Science Supervisor, I instituted numerous collaborations between teachers and principals to try new approaches or strategies for reaching historically unreachable students. Successful experiments yielded knowledge that was transferred to other teachers via teacher training activities. Teachers were also encouraged to become leaders and were often sent at no expense to local, statewide, and national conferences and conventions to increase their knowledge which was then multiplied in subsequent staff development sessions. I noted that most teachers are willing to make changes in their delivery of instruction if it improves student achievement with small incremental changes in teaching style.

Next, as a school based administrator, I developed a training program for parents. Also during this time I learned that being smart sometimes carried a bad stigma- especially for females. So I developed and administered the 1200+ Club as a special reward and recognition for students who achieved at a high level on the SAT. The club became a source of pride for the students and community – especially after the parents were invited to attend the breakfast awards ceremony where the incoming students were recognized for their outstanding efforts. These students reminded me that social interaction counts as part of the learning process.


For 5 years, I also created, refined, administered, and evaluated a Gifted and Talented Summer Center focusing on Science, Mathematics, and Technology sponsored by the Maryland State Department of Education. Open-ended challenges were presented to the students. Amazed at the opportunity to experiment without a pre-determined ending, the students flourished and created clever responses that often surprised the participating teachers. Techniques and insights learned from the experience were taken back into the classroom by participating teachers and refined to meet local needs. These students taught me that educators often horribly underestimate what their students are capable of accomplishing.

During my lengthy tenure as the Science Supervisor and high school administrator, I made the best use of my time. I completed my doctorate from Nova Southeastern University with the capstone practicum where differential staffing was assessed at the local high school to determine its usefulness in terms of student achievement, teacher friendliness, and overall student satisfaction. I also made numerous presentations at national, statewide, and local venues including the National Science Teachers Association. I was appointed by the Governor to serve on the Hazardous Substances Committee which I eventually chaired until completion of my rotation. The local power company, a longtime supporter of science education in the region, awarded me a Lifetime Achievement Award for my 20 years of collaborative service to improve science education. In my spare time, I wrote the Complete Idiot’s Guide for Biology (Penguin), and Surviving the First Year of Teaching (American Board for Certification for Teacher Excellence) and was popular delivering podcasts for ABCTE related to solving common teacher problems. Finally, as a last measure of success before my retirement, the county scores on the statewide assessment in biology were the highest in Maryland, a state already renowned for educational prowess. In fact, one high school boasted a 100% passing rate which included special education students on the statewide No Child Left Behind Biology assessment.

Since my partial retirement, I have written the PRAXIS II: Biology Cliff’s Notes (Harcourt), and the PRAXIS II: General Science Cliff’s Notes (Harcourt). I am also currently working on the second edition of the PRAXIS II: Biology Cliff's Notes. My most recent endeavor is writing a challenging program for reluctant learners called Express Science (CurrTech Integrations). The utility of Express Science makes the series a popular and prominent tool for teachers.

I currently teach Chemistry and sometimes Anatomy and Physiology part-time at Rogue Community College.










Degrees Earned

  • Illinois State University, BSEd
  • Purdue University, MS
  • NOVA Southeastern University, Ed.D

PETERKIN, KAREN KPeterkin@roguecc.edu  541-608-5118  Bio

Faculty

Degrees Earned

  • Cal State Univ Long Beach, BA
  • San Jose State University, MS

ROBINSON, EVELINE (EVELYN) ERobinson@roguecc.edu    Bio

Part-time Faculty

Instructor Robinson, Eveline (Evelyn)

Biography

I was born and raised in Mainz, Germany. I received my Diplom (=Master’s Degree) in Biology from the Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz. I worked a few years in the pharmaceutical industry. Then, I moved to the United States to attend the University of California at Berkeley. I received my PhD in Entomology in 1995.



ROGERS, CHARLES CRogers@roguecc.edu  541-245-7527   
SALSEDO, SCOTT SSalsedo@roguecc.edu     
SMITH, HELAINE HeSmith@roguecc.edu  541-956-7064  Bio

Science Lab Technician II

Biography






STRAHAN, ROBERT RStrahan@roguecc.edu     
STRICKLER, MIKE      
WHITE, LINDA LWhite@roguecc.edu     
Department Staff
FREDERICKSON, BEA BFrederickson@roguecc.edu  541-245-7527  Bio

Secretary III

Biography

I've worked with several academic departments since 1997 and really enjoy my job duties and the contact with faculty and students.



LOTT, NICHOLE NLott@roguecc.edu  541-245-7581   
MITCHELL, CAMILLE CMitchell@roguecc.edu  541-245-7581  Bio

Science Lab Technician

Biography




Degrees Earned

  • Rogue Community College, General Studies

SMITH, HELAINE HeSmith@roguecc.edu  541-956-7064  Bio

Science Lab Technician II

Biography






ALICE TEMPLE     Bio

Secretary III

Degrees Earned

  • Alfred State College, A.A.S.